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  • Informers in the ranks of your negotiating partner can be very handy. Maintain regular contact and try to build them up long before an upcoming negotiation.
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  • Do you find your negotiating partner unpleasant? Think twice. This may only be your personal impression and that is not necessarily correct. Try to give them a second chance always.
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  • Tough negotiations are incredibly stressful. It is therefore very important to learn to recognise and control your own stress level – otherwise the other side may take advantage of you.
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  • Using the right words at the right time – this is of major importance in difficult negotiations. Therefore, make sure the other party understands what you are saying at all times. Use the subjunctive mood so you avoid committing too early.
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  • In most negotiations, there are Dealmakers and Realmakers that influence the outcome. The Realmaker is responsible for implementing the agreement. Sometimes, that can mean the Realmaker is punished for the quick deal that the Dealmaker has negotiated.
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  • The perception of power is a subjective matter. A satisfactory long-term agreement is only possible between to equal parties so both sides need to take steps to equalize any imbalance in power.
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  • When faced with seemingly irrational partners, remember that this is a judgement based on your own subjective perception. Try to put the shoe on the other foot to discover what motivates your negotiating partner.
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  • Negotiating is not a matter of intuition. Difficult negotiations require strategy and tactic. Following your gut feeling in a difficult negotiation is very risky.
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  • If your negotiation is difficult because you are negotiating with a group, try to understand the group structure as quickly as possible. This will help you address the right communication partner in critical moments.
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  • When someone crosses your boundaries, in your professional or private environment, you need to act. The 1-1-1 Formula will help you develop a response.
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  • Threatening your negotiating partner will push them into a corner, and they will start to fight you. Use a warning instead – if the opposite side increases resistance, a warning is an effective instrument to get them back to the negotiating table.
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